Results tagged ‘ Nats ’

Nats’ Span could be back earlier than expected

WASHINGTON — It looks like center fielder Denard Span will be back with the Nationals sooner than expected. Span, who is on the disabled list because of a torn rectus abdominis muscle, could be back on the field by late April. Originally, he thought he would return to action sometime in May.

Early Monday afternoon, Span was doing hard sprints on the outfield grass. He already played two Minor League games –defense only—and will play a simulated game on Tuesday at Nationals Park. He is expected to swing the bat that day.  Span then will return to the team’s Spring Training complex in Viera, Fla., later this week and continue to his rehab assignment.

“I feel pretty good,” Span said. “I still have a lot of work to do. I have to get in real game situations as far as hitting, stealing bases, going first to third. Starting next week, we are going to start doing that stuff. If I continue to get well, I think I will be back before May.”

Being in the best of shape is one of the reasons Span is optimistic that he can come back earlier than expected.

“I’ve taken pride in my work ethic. So I’m sure that’s why I’m in the position I’m in now,” Span said. “I’ve taken the rehab process very seriously. I haven’t cut any corners. So that is the big reasons I’m feeling pretty good.”

Outfielder Jayson Werth was hoping that he could play in the Opening Day game against the Mets on Monday, but after deciding not to play in a Minor League game at 9:00a.m on Sunday, he decided not to rush back. Werth still needs more at-bats and he has mild discomfort in his right shoulder.

Werth is still shooting to play his first Major League game of the season on April 13 against the Red Sox. He is on the disabled list because of shoulder surgery he had in his right AC joint in January.

Werth is expected to be in a rehab assignment once the Minor League season starts April 9th.

“We talked about playing today, but I’m not quite ready,” Werth said. “But we are coming along. It’s definitely progressing. I’ve been playing in the Minor Leagues [during Spring Training]. I wanted to be here today. I have a couple of more hurdles to cross before I’m ready to go.”

 

20-20 (Part II): Ian Desmond joins elite company

By Andrew Simon

When Ian Desmond swiped second base in the seventh of Sunday’s nightcap against the Marlins, it gave him 20 stolen bases and his second consecutive season with at least 20 steals and 20 homers.

Considering that Desmond plays a prime defensive position at shortstop, that blend of power and speed is a rare commodity. Six other players have hit the 20-20 mark this year, and all of them are outfielders. Only three other infielders are anywhere close with a week left to go, but none of them are shortstops.

In fact, Desmond is now only the seventh shortstop in history with multiple 20-20 seasons, joining Hanley Ramirez (four), Jimmy Rollins (four), Alex Rodriguez (three), Derek Jeter (two), Barry Larkin (two) and Alan Trammell (two).

“He does it all,” said center fielder Denard Span, who is first-year teammates with Desmond. “I’m gonna be honest with you — has a strong arm, hits for power, hits for average. He’s the total package. I knew him for a few years before I got here but I never had a chance to watch him play up close and personal and he’s definitely the real deal.”

Span also praised the intelligence, work ethic and drive Desmond brings on a daily basis.

The 28-year-old has played in and started 153 of the Nats’ 156 games this year and on Monday will hit the 154-game plateau for the third time in his four full big league seasons. Manager Davey Johnson called him “Iron Man Desi,” on Saturday, when he brought him up as a worthy candidate for team MVP, alongside Jayson Werth.

Quality has matched quantity, too. Desmond’s .286/.338/.465 batting line with 20 homers gets him close to his numbers from a breakout 2012, and he already has set a career high with 80 RBIs. He also has accrued a career-best 5.1 wins above replacement (according to FanGraphs.com), thanks to solid contributions offensively, defensively and on the bases. That puts him second among MLB shortstops, behind only Troy Tulowitzki.

“Every day he’s ready to go, same intensity,” Span said. “He never looks tired, never looks frustrated or flustered. He’s always ready to go. He’s definitely a gamer.”

Two innings after Desmond reached 20-20, he took first on an intentional walk. With one out in the ninth inning of a tie game, he broke for second on the back end of a double steal and slid in safely for No. 21.

Clearly, he wasn’t satisfied.

“It’s pretty cool. It’s definitely a blessing,” he said of the accomplishment, which earned him an ovation from the crowd at the end of the inning. “I wasn’t always headed down this road in my life, and I’m just fortunate and try to take every day as a blessing and just try to do the best I can every day.”

Haren to Nats: “Keep this group together”

By Andrew Simon 

Sunday afternoon’s loss to the Marlins was Dan Haren’s final start of the season at Nationals Park. By his own admission, it probably was his last there, period, as a member of the Nationals.

Haren signed a one-year deal with Washington last offseason, and despite a second-half rebound, the overall results have been rocky. At 9-14 with a 4.87 ERA, the veteran right-hander admits, “I was part of the reason we were so many games down,” in the playoff race.

Yet even if Haren doesn’t return, he sees a bright future for the Nats — as long as they stay the course. In his opinion, the club shouldn’t take this year’s likely disappointing finish as a sign to make radical changes. He pointed to his last team, the Angels, who went 89-73 but missed the playoffs with Haren in 2012. An altered roster, including big free agent signing Josh Hamilton, was 76-78 going into Sunday.

“This area has a lot to look forward to,” Haren said. “I think last year in L.A., we won 89-90 games and they kind of blew up the team, and I think they’ve struggled most of the year and got on track late in the year. I think that was the wrong thing to do.

“I know there’ll be some subtle changes, me probably being one of them. But I think the most important thing is to keep this group together. This could be a building block. Last year they had a great year and this year we’ve shown a lot of fight here the last few months. I think as close as things could stay to the guys in this room, I think the better.”

That means keeping the roster largely intact. But, as Haren said, it’s also “top-down, manager-wise.”

The Nationals, of course, must find a replacement for the retiring Davey Johnson, who has voiced support for bench coach Randy Knorr, in addition to third base coach Trent Jewett. The organization also figures to consider outside candidates, but Haren thinks Knorr would be a good choice.

“Randy I think could step in and do a real good job,” Haren said. “I think the guys overall really like him. So it just kind of goes into the organization not really needing to do that much. We got off to a slow start, but I think we’ve learned a lot of things.”

Riggleman has job interview with Giants next week

Former Nationals manager Jim Riggleman will go to San Francisco next week to interview for a job with the Giants, according to Riggleman’s agent, Burton Rocks.

It’s not known what kind of job Riggleman will interview for. Rocks said general manager Brian Sabean and manager Bruce Bochy have reached out to Riggleman after the latter resigned as skipper of the Nationals on June 23rd.

“They reached out to Jim out of friendship. Bruce is one of Jim’s dearest friends,” Rocks said via phone.

Riggleman managed the Nationals for almost two years, going 140-172.

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